easc121syl

Heartland Community College

Science Technology Engineering Mathematics and Business Division

Course Syllabus for Students Spring 2015

 

Course Prefix and Number: EASC 121-04

Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCE

 

CREDIT HOURS:  3

CONTACT HOURS

         LECTURE HOURS:  3   LABORATORY HOURS:  0

EASC 121 04 meets from 12:30-1:45 TR

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

COURSE NUMBER/TITLE/CREDITS:

 

            EASC 121       Introduction to Earth Science, 3 Semester Credit Hours

 

  INTRODUCTION:

  This class is an introductory course designed to give an overview of the physical

 nature and processes that shape the environment both on and beyond the earth.

 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

 

This is an introductory physical science class that surveys the fields of geology, oceanography, atmospheric science and astronomy.  An optional lab (EASC 122) will apply earth science principles to lecture material.  Environmental concerns will be discussed in this class.  This class is suitable for students with minimal course work in the sciences and mathematics.

 

TEXTBOOKS:

 

            Earth Science, 14th Edition, Tarbuck and Lutgens, Prentice Hall.

 

PREREQUISITE FOR THIS COURSE:

            None.

STUDENTS FOR WHOM THIS COURSE IS INTENDED:

 

            Non-science majors who my have had little or no exposure to this topic in high

           school.

 

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION:

             

            Name: Bob Dennison

            Office: ICB 2408

            Phone: (309) 268-8646

            Email:  robert.dennison@heartland.edu

            Office Hours

            Monday/Wednesday from 8:00 - 9:30

            Tuesday/Thursday from 11:00 - 12:30                      

 

COURSE PURPOSE:

LEARNING OUTCOMES (COURSE OBJECTIVES):

 

Course Outcomes

HCC Essential Competencies

Range of Assessment Methods

  1. Understand  how to process knowledge and evaluate information using the scientific method.

Throughout the semester students will achieve the following General Education Outcomes.  Course outcomes may correlate to one or more of the following General Education Outcomes.

 

PS 2: Student identifies the type of problem and used a framework to solve the problem

CO 2: Student effectively delivers a message via channels/modalities

CT 1: Students gather knowledge, apply it to a new situation, and draw reasonable conclusions in ways that demonstrate comprehension

DI 3: Student reflects upon the formation of their own perspectives, beliefs, opinions, attitudes, ideals, and values

The following are possible formative assessments an instructor may use to assess student learning and course pedagogy: 

group discussion, student presentations, worksheets, in-class questions, self-assessment exercises, end-of chapter exercises

 

The following are possible summative assessments that an instructor may use:  exams, papers, quizzes, projects, presentations, other assessments may also be applied as deemed appropriate by the instructor 

  1. Develop an understanding of how natural systems operate and interact as a holistic system.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and theories in the areas of geology, meteorology, astronomy and oceanography.

 

  1. Identify and examine how knowledge of earth systems can be applied to the concept of sustainability.

 

  1. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate information and use reasoning skills to formulate and support personally held beliefs.

 

 

RELATIONSHIP TO ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS AND TRANSFERABILITY:

 

EASC 121 fulfills 3 of the semester hours of credit in Life and Physical Science required for the A.A. or A.S. degree. This course should transfer as part of the General Education Core Curriculum described in the Illinois Articulation Initiative to other Illinois colleges and universities participating in the IAI. However, students should consult an academic advisor for transfer information regarding particular institutions. Refer to the IAI web page for information as well at www.itransfer.org

 

 

 

EDUCATIONAL BELIEFS:

 

BELIEFS ABOUT STUDENT LEARNING:

 

Students must take an active role in the learning process for it to take place and for

 you to feel a sense of accomplishment.  Desire, effort, and persistence are the key 

ingredients to your success.

 

BELIEFS ABOUT TEACHER’S ROLE:

 

I will be responsible for creating an atmosphere conducive to the learning process.  Please feel free to ask me questions either during your class period or my office hours or whenever we can make a connection.

 

DESCRIPTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES AND RATIONALE:

 

Discussions, tests, quizzes, and written reports.  Students will have the opportunity to ask questions and contribute throughout.

 

DESCRIPTION OF LEARNING FORMAT:

 

            Students will be able to achieve success by:

1.      Attending class sessions regularly.

2.      Participating in discussions and group work.

3.      Asking questions about material you do not understand.

4.      Doing careful, thoughtful and thorough work.

5.      Reading the assigned material before class lecture and again afterwards.

6.      Taking good notes and reviewing them regularly.

7.      Reviewing the key terms and questions at the end of each chapter.

8.      Reviewing the material listed on your test review sheets.

9.      Forming a study group with other members of this class.

10.  Attending class on time..

 

FEEDBACK AND GRADING

 

GRADING SYSTEM/METHOD OF EVALUATION:

 

Scale:  A > 90%, B = 80-89%, C = 70-79%, D =60-69%, F<60%.  Five exams over the lectures are planned. 

Your four highest test scores will be added together and the lowest grade will be dropped out of the first four exams &

you must take the final exam.  The exams will be worth 2/3 of your grade.  The remaining 1/3 will come from quizzes, written

assignments, class participation, and attendance. No makeup tests will be given.  If you miss a test you will receive a grade 

of “0” and that score will be the one dropped in calculating your total points.  There is no makeup allowed for quizzes and all assignments must be turned in on time. NO LATE WORK ALLOWED.

 

POLICIES ON ASSIGNMENTS/TESTS/MAKEUPS:

 

No makeup for tests, assignments or quizzes.  There are no make-ups for quizzes or other assignments given in class except for those students participating in an approved Heartland Community College sanctioned event who have fulfilled the requirement to receive a make-up. Assignments are due per the instructor’s direction. No exceptions to this rule will be granted.

 

POLICIES ON ATTENDANCE:

 

Regular class attendance [including being on time] is an important part of educational success and is expected of all students.  You are responsible for the information presented in each class for the lecture exams. If at midterm you have missed more than 25% of your classes without consulting with the instructor or more than one exam you will be dropped from the class.

Midterm Withdrawal Policy:

Students are expected to attend all classes and meaningfully participate each day. Any student who does not make reasonable attempts to successfully complete all course activities (exams, homework, quizzes, etc.), may be withdrawn from the course at midterm.

However, if any of the following situations apply, the student will be automatically withdrawn by the end of week 8:

·         was absent for any 2 consecutive weeks without appropriate notice

·         has more than 5 unexcused absences

·         Did not complete at least 60% of assignments

 

General Information for Students

 

Testing Services (located in Student Commons Building 2001)

 

Testing Services provides a secure testing environment for students who are enrolled in online, hybrid, and other distance learning courses; have a documented disability; or need to take a make-up exam.  Testing accommodations for students having documented disabilities must be arranged by the student through Disability Support Services.  Testing Services will only administer exams at the request of the instructor.  For more information, please call (309) 268-8050.

Counseling Services

Counseling Services provides confidential and professional counseling for both emergency and personal issues. Services also include referrals to local community resources and support for students on academic probation. For more information, please call (309) 268-8318.

 

Services in Academic Support Center (Raab Road campus)

 

Library                      

The Library provides fast and free access to credible information from a full range of resources including books, online journals, videos, newspapers, online music, class reserves, and interlibrary loan. Individualize research by appointment or come in anytime.  See the Library tab in myHeartland, email library@heartland.edu or call (309) 268-8292 for details.

 

Tutoring Services     

Tutoring Services provides tutoring in various forms at no cost to Heartland students in Normal, Pontiac, and Lincoln. Tutors are available at convenient times throughout the week.  Study groups are also available by request.  For more information about services available at each location, please call (309) 268-8231 (Normal), (815) 842-6777 (Pontiac), or (217) 735-1731 (Lincoln).

 

Disability Support Services

Disability Support Services (DSS) ensures that students with disabilities have equal access to the college’s programs, services and activities through the provision of reasonable accommodations as mandated in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. DSS offers a wide range of services to support students with disabilities, including: assistive technology, document conversion services, personnel, classroom and testing accommodations. Students with a documented disability who wish to discuss academic accommodations should call (309) 268-8259 for details.

 

Open Computing Lab          

The Open Computing Lab provides free computing for HCC students at convenient times throughout the week.  The computer lab is staffed by trained Lab Assistants and offers the use of approximately 70 computers, a scanner, a laser printer, and an electric typewriter.

 

Writing Lab

The Writing Lab provides guidance for writers on assignment comprehension, critical thinking and the stages of the writing process.  The Writing Lab is staffed by English faculty and Tutors with years of experience working with students on writing. In every session, supportive staff  work with writers to explore and develop their own ideas as appropriate to the needs of their readers and to learn the rhetorical strategies necessary for effective communication.  For more information, please call (309) 268-8231.

 

Services in Community Commons Building, first floor (Raab Road campus)

 

Academic Advising

Academic advisors provide information to students about degree/program requirements, transferability of courses, GPA, and enrollment.  Academic Advising may also provide workshops on time management, IRIS navigation, or specific career fields.  For more information, please call (309) 268-8033.  Academic Advising services are also available at the Lincoln and Pontiac sites. 

 

 

Career Services

Career Services assist students to determine career goals, develop employability and job search skills and connect with potential employers in preparation for employment and career transitions.  Through the Online Career Center at www.collegecentral.com/heartland students can learn about area employment opportunities, prepare and post resumes and find a host of free career-related resources.  The job shadow and internship programs offer access to relevant work-based learning opportunities that enhance academic experiences and support students in their career pursuits.  For more information, please call (309) 268-8034 or email Career.Services@heartland.edu.

 

 

Financial Aid Office

The Financial Aid Office provides information on programs and types of financial aid available to students.  For more information, please call (309) 268-8020.

 

Transcripts (Located in Student Commons Building 1000)

Official and unofficial transcripts may be obtained in the Student Records Office.   Transcripts may also be obtained at Heartland’s Lincoln and Pontiac sites.  Official transcripts must be requested in writing.  The form is available online (http://www.heartland.edu/transcripts/index.jsp) or in the Student Records Office.  Unofficial transcripts are available to print online through IRIS.

 

 

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

 

            Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a fundamental principle of collegial life at Heartland Community College and is essential to the credibility of the College’s educational programs.  Moreover, because grading may be competitive, students who misrepresent their academic work violate the right of their fellow students.  The College, therefore, views any act of academic dishonest as a serious offense requiring disciplinary measures, including course failure, suspension, and even expulsion from the College.  In addition, an act of academic dishonesty may have unforeseen effects far beyond any officially imposed penalties.

Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to cheating, aiding or suborning cheating or other acts of academic dishonesty, plagiarism, misrepresentation of data, falsification of academic records or documents and unauthorized access to computerized academic or administrative records or systems.  Definitions of these violations may be found in the college catalog.

 

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the presenting of others’ ideas as if they were your own. When you write a paper, create a project, do a presentation or create anything original, it is assumed that all the work, except for that which is attributed to another author or creator, is your own. Plagiarism is considered a serious academic offense and may take the following forms:

·         Copying word-for-word from another source and not giving that source credit.

·         Paraphrasing the work of another and not giving that source credit.

·         Adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own.

·         Using an image or a copy of an image without crediting its source.

·         Paraphrasing someone else’s line of thinking in the development of a topic as if it were your own.

·         Using another person’s project or another person’s work as if it were your own.

 

[Adapted from the Modem Language Association’s MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th ed. New York: MLA, 2009:51-61]

 

Note that word-for-word copying is not the only form of plagiarism. The penalties for plagiarism may be severe, ranging from failure on the particular piece of work, failure in the course or expulsion from school in extreme cases.

 

Many plagiarism problems can be remedied by citing the sources of the original work. 

When in doubt, cite the source according to the style your instructor directs. Usually this is APA or MLA Style.  Don’t be daunted by citing sources which are not books.  You can cite everything, including pamphlets, maps, cereal boxes, telephone conversations, movies, television shows, Internet and world-wide web sites.

Philosophy of Grades

 

The Heartland Community College grading philosophy grows out of our vision of

educational excellence. This common philosophy provides a framework for each

academic division and instructor as they establish their own individual course grading

system, evaluation methods, and course policies using the shared general rubrics for letter

grades given below.

 

Letter grades serve as a vehicle to promote meaningful evaluation of student

achievement, to inform students of academic progress, and, as necessary, to improve

student performance, habits, and practices. Using a letter grade as a prerequisite for

subsequent courses means we believe that the grade was assigned through a conscious

judgment about a student’s readiness to proceed to more advanced study.

 

At Heartland, students’ academic achievement is measured by their mastery of course

objectives and content. We challenge students to meet these recognized standards of

achievement and we assign grades based on their success in doing so. Simply stated, we

believe that the responsibility for academic achievement rests with the student and that

holding students responsible for their learning promotes their academic growth.

 

 

Letter Grade Rubrics

“A” This grade represents consistently outstanding performance that demonstrates

superior understanding and skillful use of important course concepts. Performance at this

level signifies that the student is extremely well prepared to continue with more advanced

study of the subject.

“B” This grade represents performance significantly beyond the level necessary to

achieve the course objectives. Work is of high quality but not consistently at an

outstanding level. Performance at this level signifies that the student is well prepared to

continue with more advanced study of the subject.

“C” This grade represents an acceptable achievement of the course objectives.

Performance at this level signifies that the student is reasonably well prepared to continue

with more advanced study of the subject.

“D” This grade represents less than adequate performance. It signifies questionable

readiness to proceed with more advanced study of the subject.

“F” This grade reflects unacceptable performance. The student is not yet ready to

proceed with more advanced study of the subject, and must repeat the course successfully

to receive credit.


 

 

CURRICULAR AND TRANSFER STATUS

DEGREE/CERTIFICATE:

 

            This course counts toward completion of the A. A. Degree or the A. S. Degree.

 

 

TRANSFERABILITY:

 

Check with an advisor to get specific transfer information related to the school you wish to attend.

 

STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS AND PURPOSE

RELATIONSHIP OF COURSE GOALS TO ASSIGNMENTS:

 

            Each assignment provides background needed to achieve course goals.

 

RATIONALE FOR COURSE CONTENT:

 

Course content covers science fundamentals and basic techniques necessary for more advanced science courses.  Topics in the class will increase earth-environment awareness.

 

WHAT STUDENTS NEED TO BRING TO EACH LAB MEETING:

 

1.                  Pencil and pen

2.                  Calculator

3.                  Notebook

4.                  Textbook

5.           If you bring a cell phone make certain that it is turned OFF and sitting in plain sight   on your desk.

 

CALENDAR & ASSIGNMENTS

 

ASSIGNMENTS

TEST ONE MATERIAL

 

Week 1 - Introduction

Week 2 - Chapter 21 – Origin of Modern Astronomy

Week 3 -Chapter 22 – Touring Our Solar System

Week 4 - Chapter 13 – The Ocean Floor

Week 5 - Chapter 15 – The Dynamic Ocean

Test One  approximately Week 5 (check Blackboard Announcements for exact date)

 

TEST TWO MATERIAL

 

Week 6 - Chapter 2 – Minerals: Building Blocks of Rocks

Week 6 - Chapter 3 – Rocks

Week 7 - Chapter 8 - Earthquakes

Week 8 - Chapter 7 – Plate Tectonics

Week 9 - Chapter 9 – Igneous Activity

Test Two Approximately Week 9 (check Blackboard Announcements for exact date)

 

 

 

 

TEST THREE MATERIAL

Week 10 - Chapter 4 - Weathering, Soil & Mass Wasting

Week 11 - Chapter 5 – Running Water and Groundwater

Week 12 - Chapter 6 – Glaciers, Deserts, and Wind

Test Three Approximately Week 12 (check Blackboard Announcements for exact date)

 

TEST FOUR MATERIAL

 

Week 13 - Chapter 16 – Composition, Structure, and Temperature

Week 14 - Chapter 17 – Moisture, Clouds, and Precipitation

Test Four approximately Week 14 (check Blackboard Announcements for exact date)

 

TEST FIVE MATERIAL (FINAL EXAM)

Week 15 - Chapter 18 - Air Pressure and Wind

Week 16 - Chapter 19 – Weather Patterns and Severe Storms

Test Five [Final Exam] (check Blackboard Announcements for exact date)

 

DATES FOR EXAMS/QUIZZES

 

You will be informed at least one week in advance of your scheduled test.  Check your myHeartland email for updates. Quizzes can occur with or without prior notice.

 

 

 

 

FINAL EXAM SCHEDULE

 

12:00-1:50 am on Tuesday, May 12.

 

 

CLASS CANCELLATION ON INTERNET

Notice of Canceled Class Sessions
Cancelled class sessions, for all HCC classes, will be listed under Cancelled Class Meetings in the A-Z Index and under Academic Information in the Current Students page on the HCC Web site. Go to http://www.heartland.edu/classCancellations/ to learn what classes have been cancelled for that day and the upcoming week. Be sure to check the last column, which might contain a message from the instructor.

 

 

NO CLASSES ON:

 January 19     Martin Luther King Jr. Day - No Classes

 March 9-13    Spring Break - No Classes

 

 

CLASS DECORUM

Cell phones must be turned off during class period.  Any cell phone that goes off during an exam will result in the score of ZERO for that student for disrupting the others in the class. If a cell phone goes off during the lecture the student will be asked to leave the class room.

Text messaging during class time is not allowed.  Anyone caught text messaging during class time will be asked to leave the classroom immediately.

Excessive talking in class other than that related to class material will result in you be asked to leave the classroom.  You will be given one verbal warning and if you do not comply with that you must leave the room.

 

WITHDRAWAL DATES

      Students are responsible for officially dropping/withdrawing in writing to Student Services/Registration from a course for which they have enrolled.  Drop/Withdrawal requests made by telephone will not be accepted.

       Final day to withdraw is April 8th

SYLLABUS DISCLAIMER:

 

The instructor reserves the right to make adjustments to this syllabus as needed.  Students will be notified in the event any such changes are made. 

 

 

 

 

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