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Bob Dennison
Professor of Earth Science & Geography

2408 Instructional Commons Building
1500 W. Raab Rd., Normal IL 61761
(309) 268-8646
Robert.Dennison@heartland.edu
 

                                                         

Links to Classes:

*REGULAR SEMESTER*

EASC 111        EASC 121        EASC 122        GEOG 101  

 Fall Schedule    Spring Schedule    

 

*SUMMER SCHOOL*

EASC 111          EASC 121        EASC 122        GEOG101    Schedule

 

Office: ICB 2408       Phone: (309) 268-8646    

Email: robert.dennison@heartland.edu  PLEASE NOTE THAT AS OF 2/10/09 I WILL NO LONGER ACCEPT OR OPEN ANY EMAIL FROM STUDENTS UNLESS IT IS FROM THEIR MYHEARTLAND ACCOUNT.  THIS APPLIES TO ALL STUDENTS!!!!!

 

Description of duties:

Teach classes in the Earth Science Section of the Math & Science Division.  Classes taught include EASC 111 - Environment Earth, EASC 121 - Intro to Earth Science, & EASC 122 Intro to Earth Science Lab.  Also I teach GEOG 101 - World Geography.

Education:

B. S. in Geography, Eastern Illinois University, 1976

M. S. in Geography, University of Southern Mississippi, 1983

 

Teaching Experience:

Heartland Community College, 2001 - present.

Illinois State University, 1988 - 1999.  Worked as both part and full time instructor teaching Earth Science, Weather, World Regional Geography, and a graduate level course in Urban Geography.

Lincoln College, Normal Annex, 1988, Earth Science.

Illinois Central College, 1990 - 1991, Earth Science.

Heartland Community College, 1992 (summer), Earth Science.

Illinois Valley Community College, 1991 - 2001.  Full time tenured instructor teaching classes in Weather, Earth Science, Cultural Geography, and World Regional Geography.  As part of my teaching load, I was assigned to teach a class in Cultural Geography at Sheridan Correctional Center where I taught about 25 - 30 inmates on five separate occasions.

 

 

Links to:

Scientific Method

WORLD CLOCK

Personal Data

Guidelines for written reports

Seven Simple Rules For My Classes

 

WAYS TO SUCCEED IN SCHOOL

 

1.  GO TO CLASS EVERY DAY AND BE ON TIME! Missing Class

2.  DO HOMEWORK (DON'T GET BEHIND) Why Am I Failing?

3.  REVIEW NOTES WITHIN 1 HOUR OF CLASS ENDING (IMPROVES YOUR RETENTION BY 80%)

4.  STUDY IN THE LIBRARY AT LEAST 1 HOUR DAILY:

A. AT TABLES: BOOK FLAT ON TABLE

     B. NO COMFY CHAIRS

     C. FEET FLAT ON FLOOR

     D. BACK STRAIGHT

     E. NO CELL PHONE

     F. NO FOOD (SUGAR TENDS TO REDUCE RETENTION CAPACITY SO NO SWEETS WHILE STUDYING OR BEFORE TAKING A TEST)

     G. PUT TOGETHER A RETENTION DIAGRAM FROM CLASS. BY DOING THIS AS YOU READ THE MATERIAL IT WILL HELP YOU TAKE LESS NOTES DURING CLASS

5. GET COACHING WHEN NEEDED:

     A. GET TUTOR

           I. IN ADVANCE

          II. TUTORING CENTER

     B. INSTRUCTOR'S OFFICE HOURS OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT

6. VISUALIZE THE GRADE YOU DESIRE AND POST IT IN A PROMINENT PLACE THAT MAKES YOU SEE IT EVERY DAY

7. STUDY IN GROUPS

8. EAT A HEALTHY DIET AND DRINK PLENTY OF WATER EVERY DAY

 

 

12 WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR MEMORY

1. Pay attention. You can't remember what you never knew, so don't be multitasking when you're trying to learn or memorize something: Give it the spotlight of your full attention at least once.

2. Understand. The more completely you get it, the less likely you are to forget it. (If you don't understand football, you're not likely to remember the scores.)

3. Repeat and apply. Directly after learning something, repeat it, preferably out loud. Even better, use it in your own way. If you want to remember a joke, for example, tell it to someone and try to make them laugh.

4. Chunk. Although short-term memory can deal with only about seven items at a time, you can finesse this limit by grouping items together and thinking of each group as a unit. Later, you can unpack those units. Remembering the numbers 5, 4, 6, 1, 9, 8, 6, 5 and 8 is harder than remembering the numbers 546, 198 and 658.

5. Make meaning. Nonsense is hard to remember. Compare this:

disease reported control Chicago mumps the for of center an in outbreak

with this:

The Centers for Disease Control reported an outbreak of mumps in Chicago.

To make meaning where none inherently exists, the experts recommend embedding the information in an invented narrative. The license plate 3PLY981 thus becomes: Three carpenters cut a piece of plywood into nine pieces and ate one. Yes, I know, no one eats plywood; but that's actually a strength of the narrative in this case. (See step 7.)

6. Look for patterns. Stanford researchers have found that forgetting is a key aspect of good remembering, but not because you have to clear out space; rather, it's because forgetting the less relevant details reveals the more meaningful underlying structure.

7. Visualize. Search the information for some element you can turn into an image. If you've just met a Bridget Brooks and want to remember her name, you might picture the Brooklyn Bridge spanning her face from ear to ear. The more striking or ridiculous the image, the more likely it is to stick in your mind.

8. Hook it to something funny. Stalagmites or stalactites -- which ones go up? Well, it's like ants in your pants: The 'mites go up, the 'tites come down.

9. Hook it to a melody, chant, rhyme or rhythmic motion. Remember singing A-B-C-D-E-F-G to the tune of "Baa Baa Black Sheep"? How about: "In fourteen hundred and ninety-two/Columbus sailed the ocean blue"? Or try pacing rhythmically while memorizing a table of data.

10. Associate new with old. Greek and Roman orators had a trick for remembering a speech. They would create a striking image for each topic they meant to cover (see step 7), mentally put these images in the rooms of their home, and then, while giving the speech, picture strolling through their home. Each next room would remind them of their next topic, and in the proper order. Note that they didn't have to remember the order of their rooms, because this knowledge was already imprinted in their brains.

11. Link learning to environment. The memory tends to associate information with the environment in which one learns it. If you're going to be tested on something and you know where the test will occur, study the material in the same sort of place. If you don't know anything about the test site, study in a variety of locations so the memories won't get locked into cues from one environment.

12. Let 'er drift. If a memory is staying out of reach, stop fishing for it, the experts say. Instead, let your mind drift to the general area: to friends you knew then, to the school you went to, the car you drove ... with luck, you'll happen into the end piece of a chain of links leading to the memory you're after.
 

First Used 1/14/02             Last Updated: 12/10/14

                                                                                                                                                              
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Email: robert.dennison@heartland.edu
Phone: (309) 268-8646
Fax: (309) 268-7964

Heartland Community College
1500 W. Raab Rd.
Normal, IL 61761

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